Sheila Hicks

Sheila Hicks (b.1934, Hastings, Nebraska) received BFA (1957) and MFA (1959) degrees from the Yale School of Art under the tutelage of Josef Albers. Awarded a Fulbright scholarship to paint in Chile, she photographed indigenous weavers and archeological sites in the Andes beginning an investigation into fiber as an artistic medium that Hicks continues to this day.
Sheila Hicks’ earliest weaving exhibitions took place in the Galeria Antonio Souza, Mexico City (1961) and The Art Institute of Chicago (1963). Numerous solo exhibitions followed: Galerie Bab Rouah, Rabat, Morocco (1971); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (1974); Lunds Konsthall, Lund, Sweden (1978); Israel Museum, Jerusalem (1980); Seoul Art Center (1991); and Uměleckoprůmyslové Museum, Prague (1992). A major retrospective, Sheila Hicks: 50 Years, debuted at the Addison Gallery of American Art in Andover, Massachusetts (2010) and traveled to the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia and the Mint Museum in Charlotte, North Carolina. Other recent solo presentations include the exhibition Foray into Chromatic Zones, at the Hayward Gallery in London (2015) and a large-scale installation entitled Baôli in the Grande Rotonde at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris (2014-15). She will be the subject of upcoming solo exhibitions at the Contemporary Art Museum, St. Louis (2015); Louis Vuitton Foundation, Munich (2015); the Joslyn Art Museum in Omaha, Nebraska (2016); Museo de Arte Contemporaneo in Puebla, Mexico (2016); and Centre Pompidou, Paris (2017). Her work is also currently on view in the "Constellations" display at Tate Liverpool (2015-2017) and the group exhibition "wow! Woven? Entering the (sub) Textiles” at KM – Künstlerhaus, Halle für Kunst & Medien in Graz, Austria (2015). She will participate in the Biennale of Sydney and the Hangzhou Triennial of Fiber Art, China (both 2016).
Hicks has created monumental site-specific works for the Ford Foundation Headquarters and Federal Courthouse in New York; The Duke Endowment in Charlotte, North Carolina; King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey amongst others.
Hicks’ work is in the permanent collections of Art Institute of Chicago; Tate Gallery, London; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Centre Pompidou, Paris; Louis Vuitton Foundation, Paris; Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; Museo de Bellas Artes, Santiago, Chile; Museum of Modern Art, the Jewish Museum, and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. and the Pérez Art Museum, Miami. 
Hicks is the recipient of numerous awards including the Smithsonian Archives of American Art Medal (2010). She was named a Chevalier dans l’ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the government of France in 1987, and elevated to Officier in 1993. Additionally, she holds Honorary Doctorates from the Ecole nationale supérieure des Beaux Arts de Paris (2014) and the Rhode Island School of Design (1984).
Sheila Hicks has resided and worked in Paris since 1964.
Sheila Hicks
October 22 - November 28, 2015
Sheila Hicks
March 6 - April 5, 2014
Sheila Hicks
April 20 - June 2, 2012
Sheila Hicks
Sheila Hicks: Weaving as Metaphor
Texts by Nina Strizler-Levine, Arthur C. Danto, and Joan Simon Hardcover, 416 pages Published by Yale University Press in association with the
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Sheila Hicks
Sheila Hicks: 50 Years
Texts by Joan Simon, Susan C. Faxon, and Whitney Chadwick Hardcover, 256 pages Published by the Yale University Press in association with the
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Sheila Hicks
The Treaty of Chromatic Zones

Art Basel 2015 | Unlimited
Presented by: Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris (Booth J12) Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York (Booth R11)   Galerie Frank Elbaz, Paris, and Sikkema Jenkins & Co., New York, are pleased to present The Treaty of Chromatic Zones, a monumental bas-relief wall installation by Sheila Hicks at the Unlimited Sector of Art Basel 2015. Working at the intersection of modern Abstraction, color theory, and constructions with pliable materials, Sheila Hicks views her work as a process that results in multi-layered interactions with the architecture it inhabits. read more